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General Laboratory: Introduction to Lean Concepts Online Training

Laboratories are under intense pressure to do more with less each day. Distinguishing the value added activities from waste and implementing continuous improvement processes can help to transform your lab.

A duplicate sample alert by the VersaCell X3 system occurs when the VersaCell X3 system has seen the same barcode for a tube on 2 occasions while the original tube is still in process. The system scans and processes the first sample tube, and generates an error after scanning the second sample tube. The second tube is not processed. The alert should be investigated to eliminate the possibility that a barcoding error has occurred with 2 separate specimens prior to loading on the system. Select next to continue. Welcome to the Introduction to Lean Concepts Online Training course.  As part of the healthcare delivery system, laboratories are under intense pressure to do more with less.  Implementing lean practices can help laboratories to do just that. Select Next to continue.   Define lean and lean thinking Describe lean concepts Identify commonly used lean tools and their application Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to: Select Next to continue. Upon successful completion of this course you will be able to describe how to navigate the Event Log, list the steps to resolve common errors, describe how to stop and restart in an emergency, and describe how to operate in Bypass Mode.  Select next to continue. Congratulations.  You have completed the Introduction to Lean Concepts Online Training course.  Listed below are the key points that have been presented.  Take time to review the material before you proceed to the final quiz.  Define lean and lean thinking Lean: Lean is a structured approach to common sense used to maximize the value stream by identifying and eliminating waste in order to “do more with less” while providing the customer with what he really wants. Lean Thinking: Lean thinking is the endless transformation of waste into value from the customers' perspective. Describe lean concepts Value Add vs. Nonvalue Add: Value-added activities are defined as those steps that increase the market form or function of the product or service.  Non-value added activities are those that do not add market form or function to the product or service, or steps that are not necessary to provide the product or service. Waste Identification: The following types of waste should be identified before implementing lean practices: defects, over production, waiting, not using staff creatively, transportation, inventory, motion, and extra processing. Standardized Work: The best documented method to safely and efficiently organize work steps into a repeatable sequence; it is the starting point for continuous improvement. Lean Metrics: Metrics used to measure the improvement that results from implementing lean practices. Visual Transparency: Clear, concise graphics that allow people to see process status. Identify commonly used lean tools Process Map: High-level view of the activities required to take a specific product from raw material to the finished product. Value Stream Map: A tool used to analyze the flow of materials and information currently required to bring a product or service to a consumer. Spaghetti Map: Spaghetti mapping is producing a visual map of the path which work physically takes through the workplace. 5 S: Refers to a list of 5 words all starting with the letter S. Sorting, Straightening, Sweeping or Shining, Standardizing and Sustaining Key Issue Identification: Key issue identification is the process of capturing people’s ideas and organizing those thoughts around common themes. Select Next to continue. Four Rules to Define Lean: 1. Structure every activity 2. Clearly and directly connect every customer and supplier 3. Specify and simplify every flow 4. Improve through experimentation at the lowest level possible Spear, S. , Bowen, H.K.  Decoding the DNA of the Toyota Production System.  Harvard Business Review; September-October 1999.  p 97-106.  Select Next to continue. Five Steps of Lean Thinking: 1. Specify value from the customer's perspective 2. Identify the value stream for each service, and remove the waste 3. Make value flow without interruptions from beginning to end 4. Let the customer pull value from our process 5. Peruse perfection with continuous improvement Continuous improvement can be accomplished through a Plan-Do-Check-Act strategy.  Womack, James P., Jones, Daniel T.  Lean Thinking-Banish Waste and Create Wealth In Your Corporation.  Free Press; c2003.  Lean Thinking versus Muda; p. 15-28.    Select Next to continue.    In this section, we will learn about the processing steps required for sample tubes, test orders, and results when an IMMULITE Immunoassay System is connected to the VersaCell X3 system. The connection of an IMMULITE Immunoassay System to the VersaCell X3 system is different from other system connections to the VersaCell X3 system in that the IMMULITE Immunoassay System connectivity does not require an interface wheel.  Instead, an automation rack is installed on the IMMULITE system's sample carousel.  The robotic arm transfers tubes directly from the VersaCell X3 system drawers to this automation rack. During the tube journey, the robotic arm scans the tube barcode and transfers the tube to the automation rack on the IMMULITE system. The VersaCell X3 system then sends the order to the IMMULITE system.  The IMMULITE system sample probe aspirates sample from the tube sitting on the automation rack for processing. When the tube is no longer needed on the automation rack, the robotic arm returns it to a drawer. The IMMULITE system processes the sample and sends the result to the VersaCell X3 system.  The VersaCell X3 system then sends the result to the LIS. Select the link to view the VersaCell X3 Solution with IMMULITE system connectivity in action. Lean Concepts include: Value Add vs. Nonvalue Add Waste Identification Standardized Work Lean Metrics Visual Transparency    Select Next to continue. Common operator errors on the VersaCell X3 system include assay errors and samples errors.  When the VersaCell X3 system is connected to an IMMULITE system, causes of assay errors can include issues with bead packs, reagent wedges, or diluent.  Causes of sample errors include insufficient sample and clots in samples.  When IMMULITE system assay and sample errors post on the VersaCell X3 system, resolve them following the standard procedures for resolving these errors.  Refer to the VersaCell X3 System Troubleshooting Online Training course and the VersaCell X3 Solution Operator's Guide for more information. One potential error that is unique to the IMMULITE system connection involves tubes that require removal from the automation rack.  Select the link to learn how to resolve this error. Value Add: Activity within a process that increases the market form or function of the product or service. Non-Value Add: Activity within a process that does not increase the market form or function or is not necessary.   1-Value added activities 2-Non-value added activities (unnecessary waste) 3-Non-value added activities (necessary waste)   Select Next to continue. Eight types of waste important to identify in the workplace include:   D Defects O Over-Production W Waiting N Not Using Staff Creatively T Transportation I Inventory M Motion E Extra Processing   Eight Deadly Wastes Learn about the eight deadly wastes of lean. Slide NumberText BlocksCalloutsAudio ScriptImage File1 Defects Scrap, mistakes, errors or corrections that require additional time, resources, and money to fix.  Select Next to continue. Note: If audio does not automatically start, select the play arrow in the top left to begin.Defects are defined as any form of scrap, mistakes, errors, or corrections resulting from the work not being done correctly the first time. Examples of defects are long or variable turnaround times, an inaccurate result, an incorrect sample, or sample tube. Select Next to Continue.2 Over-Production Doing things too early, before other things are ready to process.  Select Next to continue. Overproduction is defined as producing more, sooner, or faster than is required by the next step in the process. An example of this is the all too common process of collecting a “rainbow” of blood tubes (1 of every colored stopper in our stock: red top, blue top, green top, lavender top, etc.) on a patient when tests were ordered that only require one of those tubes. Select Next to Continue.3 Waiting Downtime that occurs when work has stopped for any reason. Select Next to continue. Waiting is downtime that can occur for a variety of reasons including insufficient staffing, long setup times, poor communications, and mismatched production rates. Examples include samples waiting to be spun or analyzed, waiting for depleted reagents to arrive, patients waiting for a blood draw, staff waiting for an answer from a supervisor, and samples waiting on a phlebotomy cart waiting to be sent to the laboratory for analysis. Select next to continue.4 Not Using Staff Creatively Misuse of qualified staff members. Select Next to continue. The next type of waste is not using staff creatively. This is the failure to use people’s education, creativity, specialized training, ideas, and abilities appropriately. A typical example of this is using a medical technologist with a bachelor’s degree to perform phlebotomy, specimen processing, or clerical duties. Select Next to Continue.5 Transportation The excess movement of materials that does not add value. Select Next to continue. The waste of transportation involves the unnecessary movement of materials. This can be caused by a poorly laid out laboratory space, as inconvenient laboratory location, having multiple drop-off locations for samples, and improperly placed instruments. Select Next to continue.6 Inventory Overstocking items, poor ordering system, poor supplier process. Select Next to continue. Inventory is defined as any supply that is in excess or lack of that required for immediate production. Lack of inventory prevents us from producing our product or service, while excess inventory adds unnecessary costs to our bottom line. Select next to continue.7 Motion The excess movement of people, equipment, paper, information, or electronic exchanges that do not add value. Select Next to continue. The waste of Motion can be defined as the excess movement of people, equipment, paper, information, or electronic exchanges that do not add value. This can cause significant slowdowns. Motion can be caused by a poor laboratory layout, workstation congestion, and poor housekeeping. Select next to continue.8 Extra Processing Putting more work, effort, or steps into a process than is required. When complete, select the X in the upper-right corner to close the window and continue.The waste of over-processing is defined as putting more work, effort, or steps into a process than is required. Examples include the sorting and resorting of samples, over inspection of specimens, labeling and re-labeling of specimens, and, worst of all is the “oops, we had a problem so we added steps to our process that do not add value and may involve rework “just in case” the problem occurs again. Select the X in the upper right corner to close this window and continue. Standardized Work is the baseline for continuous improvement and primarily aids in the identification of: • Motion • Waiting Liker, Jeffrey K., Meier, D. The Toyota Way Fieldbook: A Practical Guide for Implementing Toyota’s 4P’s. McGraw-Hill.c2006. Chapter 6. Establish Standardized Processes and Procedures; p. 111-144. Select Next to continue.   Congratulations.  You have completed the VersaCell X3 Solution with ADVIA Centaur XP System Connectivity Online Training course.  Listed below are the key points that have been presented.  Take time to review the material before you proceed to the final quiz. Lean Metrics are used to measure the resulting improvement from the implementation of lean practices. SMART objectives should be used when implementing Lean:   S Specific M Measurable A Action R Realistic T Time-based   Select Next to continue. Control samples should be placed on the ADVIA Centaur XP system and ordered using the Worklist Schedule screen in the Centaur XP software. Unresulted control test orders do not display on the VersaCell X3 Test Results screen. The test appears on the Test Results screen when it results. The operator must monitor the status of in progress control test orders from the ADVIA Centaur XP software. Patient samples can be either loaded on the VersaCell X3 system drawers or loaded directly on the ADVIA Centaur XP system.  The VersaCell X3 system Test Results screen displays only results for tests ordered on the ADVIA Centaur XP system.  The Test Results screen displays both orders and results for test orders generated by the LIS. Select the links to learn more about processing patient samples. Clear, concise graphics that allow people to see process status.   Select Next to continue. Commonly used Lean Tools include the following: Process Map Value Stream Map Spaghetti Map 5 S Key Issue Identification Lean Tools Learn about commonly used lean tools. Slide NumberText BlocksCalloutsAudio ScriptImage File1 Process Map High-level view of the activities required to take a specific product from raw material to the finished product.  Variability can be caused by: Quality and variability of samples Manual vs. automated validation Flow of work to the instruments Staff skills and work methods Select Next to continue. Note: If audio does not automatically start, select the play arrow in the top left to begin.A process map is a high-level view of the activities required to take a specific product from raw material to the finished product. A lean process is efficient, effective, repeatable, reproducible, and predictable. It involves doing the right things, doing things right, doing those things the same way every time, having different people doing it do it the same every time, with a controlled variability. There are numerous causes for variability in a process including the quality of the sample collected by the phlebotomist, the use of manual rather than auto validation, inconsistent flow of samples to instruments, and varying skills and work methods by staff members. Select next to continue. 2Value Stream Map A tool used to analyze the flow of materials and information currently required to bring a product or service to a consumer. Focus on the customer Identify waste Liker, Jeffrey K., Meier, D. The Toyota Way Fieldbook: A Practical Guide for Implementing Toyota’s 4P’s. McGraw-Hill.c2006. Chapter 3. Benefits of the Value Stream Mapping Approach; p. 41-42 Select Next to continue. A value stream map is a process that focuses on the customer and allows you to visualize linked chains of processes and to envision future lean value streams. It provides a “common language” so that everyone has the same vision. 3 Spaghetti Map Visual map of the physical workflow path Created by mapping worker while tasks are completed Entire work area or subsections can be mapped Select Next to continue. Spaghetti mapping is producing a visual map of the path which work physically takes through the workplace. This should be done by actually walking the path the worker will take as they complete tasks within a work area. This can be applied to subsections of a workplace and can be completed for the entire process, start to finish for example; how a blood sample travels from patient to lab through to a result being made available in the LIS. Being able to visualize the motions taken to complete tasks can be truly eye-opening and lead to more efficient work flows. Select next to continue.4 5 S Method: Sorting: Removes redundancy Straightening: Places items in a logical order Sweeping or Shining: Cleans the area of clutter Standardizing: Assigns a place for everything Sustaining: Follows up to assure order remains Select Next to continue. Select each number to review the corresponding text.CalloutsSortingStraighteningSweeping or ShiningStandardizing Sustaining 5-S references a list of 5 Japanese words all starting with the letter S. They have been translated to English words which also begin with S: Sorting, Straightening, Sweeping or Shining, Standardizing and Sustaining. 5-S can be applied throughout an entire work process and can also be applied to individual portions of that process. The 5-S method removes redundant or unnecessary items during sorting, places the needed items in a logical order during straightening, cleans the area of clutter during shining, assigns places for everything during standardizing, and then follows up to assure order remains during sustaining. Select next to continue.5Key Issue Identification Capture ideas and organize thoughts around common themes Identify the major issues of concern Can be done using Ishikawa (cause-effect ) diagrams   When complete, select the X in the upper-right corner to close the window and continue.Key issue identification is the process of capturing people’s ideas and organizing those thoughts around common themes. This can be done by using an affinity diagram or a fishbone (or Ishikawa) diagram. Both begin with brainstorming to get all the ideas and concerns from the group on paper. With the affinity diagram, the subsequent ideas from the brainstorming are grouped into like categories to identify the key areas of concern. Similarly, with the fish-bone diagram, like causes and effects are related to each other as "bones" or causes connected to a central "back-bone" which is the main issue, or effect being addressed. Select the X in the upper right corner to close the window and continue. Let's begin with reagent probe errors.  A common reagent probe error is the volume check error.  Volume Check Errors include several different kinds of errors. Another is the TAG calibration failed error.  This error occurs when the Reagent Probe optical sensor detects a problem.  Possible causes of the Volume Check Error are bubbles in the water, or no water in the reagent probe line. The message that typically precedes the TAG error is “the reagent probe fluid sensor failed during the reference check.”  The occurrence of this error indicates that the reagent probe detected an issue before it actually aspirated any reagent and therefore, attention should be focused on the water entering the reagent probe.    The Reagent Probe may also encounter move errors. This might be caused by an obstruction.  Select the links below to learn how to resolve these errors.   Process maps provide a high-level view of activities required to take a product from raw material to a finished product. Laboratory: Sample collected from a patient to the generation of results. Process Map Learn more about Process Maps. Slide NumberText BlocksCalloutsAudio ScriptImage File1 Process Map Definition High-level view of the activities required to take a specific product from raw material to the finished product.  Variability can be caused by: Quality and variability of samples Manual vs. automated validation Flow of work to the instruments Staff skills and work methods Select Next to continue.   Note: If audio does not automatically start, select the play arrow in the top left to begin.A process map is a high-level view of a product development process from raw material to the finished product. A lean process is efficient, effective, repeatable, reproducible, and predictable. It involves doing the right things, doing things right, doing those thing the same way every time, having different people doing it do it the same every time, with a controlled variability. There are numerous causes for variability in a process including the quality of the sample collected by the phlebotomist, the use of manual rather than auto validation, inconsistent flow of samples to instruments, and varying skills and work methods by staff members. Select next to continue. 2 Process Map Purpose The purpose of a process map is to understand the steps that are required within the process.  It can serve as a checklist to ensure that the following "best practice" characteristic items have been considered: Quality is built in question Designed for one piece flow Takt time "Just in Time" Principles Pull design Poka Yoke Guarantee a process capable of meeting customer demand Elimination of waste and unevenness Select Next to continue. The purpose of a process map is to understand the steps that are required within the process; this will allow decisions to be made with regards to where consideration should be given. It can serve as a checklist to ensure that the following "best practice" characteristic items have been considered in the design. Some of these characteristics include, quality, design for one piece flow, takt time, just in time principles, use of a pull process, use of Poka Yoke or a mistake proof design, meeting customer demands, and eliminating waste and unevenness. Select next to continue.3 Process Map Utilization Process maps in laboratories can be very complex.  Create maps of sub-processes Reviewing the process with the users to identify: Value adding activity Non-value adding activity Areas of constraint When complete, select the X in the upper-right corner to close the window and continue.In the laboratory a process map of the entire pathway from sample ordering to result delivery is usually too complex to be of value. Therefore it is more common to map a sub process like pre-analytical in order to create a clear overview of the current state. Reviewing the process with the users and considering best practices it can be possible to identify non value adding activities and areas of constraint. It may be necessary to use other tools such as value stream maps and key issue identification in order to evidence the design of the new process. When complete, select the x in the upper-right corner to close the window and continue. Let’s move onto various causes of Sample Probe Errors.  Messages that may be received include the sample probe not be able to discard a tip, sample integrity errors, Pressure offset adjustment out of range and move errors. A Value Stream map is a simple pencil and paper tool used to visually represent every process in the information flow. Laboratory:  Maps are designed to reduce the number of times a sample is handled while eliminating non-value added steps in the process. Value Stream Map Learn more about Value Stream Maps. Slide NumberText BlocksCalloutsAudio ScriptImage File1Value Stream Map Definition A tool used to analyze the flow of materials and information currently required to bring a product or service to a consumer. Focus on the customer Identify waste Liker, Jeffrey K., Meier, D. The Toyota Way Fieldbook: A Practical Guide for Implementing Toyota’s 4P’s. McGraw-Hill.c2006. Chapter 3. Benefits of the Value Stream Mapping Approach; p. 41-42 Select Next to continue.   Note: If audio does not automatically start, select the play arrow in the top left to begin.Value stream mapping is a process that focuses on the customer and allows you to visualize linked chains of processes and to envision future lean value streams. It provides a “common language” so that everyone has the same vision2Value Stream Map Purpose The value stream map helps us to visualize often quite complicated laboratory processes in a simple manner : Discussion about service processes Decision making about the flow apparent Ties together Lean ideas Forms the starting point for a Lean transformation plan Helps to make the link between material flows and information flows apparent Describes in detail how a process should operate   Select Next to continue. The value stream map helps us to visualize what are often quite complicated laboratory processes in a more simplified manner. It provides a common language for talking about service processes in a meaningful way. It makes decisions about the flow apparent and ties together lots of lean ideas. It can form the starting point for a Lean transformation plan and helps us to see the link between material flows and information flows. It describes in detail how a process should operate. Select next to continue. 3Value Stream Map Utilization The purpose of creating a value stream map is to streamline our processes and eliminate waste. Think of Products and Service in terms of families or groups. Focus on one product or service family at a time. Ensure that the Value Stream Map covers an end to end process. When complete, select the X in the upper-right corner to close the window and continue.Creating a value stream map takes a bit of effort, so only carry out this work if you intend to do something with it. In other words, when you are ready to make major improvements. In choosing areas to transform it is useful to think of Products and Service in terms of families. A family is a group of services that pass through similar processing steps. An example of a family in the laboratory would be the pre-analytical process. It is sensible to focus on one product or service family at a time. It very quickly becomes over complicated and unmanageable if you try and map all your products and services at once. However it is important to recognize that organizations are often set up as functional or silo organizations which can mean the customer process is disjointed and may suffer from a lack of synchronization. Therefore it is also important to ensure that the value stream map covers an end to end process. In the laboratory for example ensure that you understand the beginning and end of the pre-analytical process. The purpose of creating a value stream map is to streamline our processes and eliminate waste. When complete, select the x in the upper-right corner to close this window and continue. Completely shutting down both the instrument and computer may be necessary if you lose power and your back up generator or UPS is not working.   When you turn the computer back on, you will be required to sign into the Windows operating system and the CP software before turning the system back on. A Spaghetti Map is a visual representation of the associated distance travel for a single cycle of a process. Graphically it represents travel distance and travel patterns. Laboratory: Spaghetti map can be used demonstrate the movement of staff throughout the laboratory. Spaghetti Map Learn more about Spaghetti Maps. Slide NumberText BlocksCalloutsAudio ScriptImage File1Spaghetti Map Definition Visual map of the physical workflow path Created by mapping worker while tasks are completed Entire work area or subsections can be mapped Select Next to continue.   Note: If audio does not automatically start, select the play arrow in the top left to begin.Spaghetti mapping produces a visual map of the path of physical work throughout the workplace. This should be done by actually walking the path of the worker will take as they complete tasks within a work area. This can be applied to subsections of a workplace and can be completed for the entire process, start to finish for example; how a blood sample travels from patient to lab through to a result being made available in the LIS. Being able to visualize the motions taken to complete tasks can be truly eye-opening and lead to more efficient work flows. Select next to continue.2 Spaghetti Map Purpose        Provides a visual representation of physical flow Identify waste in the workplace Determine flow and distance that information and people travel to process work Select Next to continue.       The Spaghetti diagram helps identify waste that is often not recognized as such. For example; walking to and from a refrigerator that is located too far from the people using it. It helps us determine the physical flow and distance that information and people travel to process work. The spaghetti diagram helps us to "see" processes and procedures in a different way. The spaghetti diagram can very often help you see waste that you didn't realize existed. Select Next to continue.3 Spaghetti Map Utilization The spaghetti map can be used:     At any time to gain clarity and understanding of your current condition  When you want to move from your current state to an improved future state To document current movement of work and people Provide insight into the distances travelled and the number and locations that work has to travel to To show transport wastes, and gives us a view of our operations which we rarely encounter on a day to day basis When complete, select the X in the upper-right corner to close the window and continue.The Spaghetti diagram can be used at any time to gain clarity and understanding of your current condition. In general the Spaghetti diagram is best used when you want to move from your current state to an improved future state. The main reason to create a spaghetti diagram is to document the current movement of work and people. It gives us an insight into the distances travelled and the number and locations that work has to travel to. It clearly shows transport wastes, and gives us a 20,000 foot view of our operations which we rarely encounter on a day to day basis. When complete, select the x in the upper-right corner to close the window and continue. 5 S is one of the lean tools used to identify problems, create a culture of discipline and make opportunities for improvement visible.  5 S is a series of actions that can be used for that improvement: Sort Set in Order Shine Standardize Sustain 5 S Learn more about 5 S. Slide NumberText BlocksCalloutsAudio ScriptImage File1 5-S Definition Sorting: Removes redundancy Straightening: Places items in a logical order Sweeping or Shining: Cleans the area of clutter Standardizing: Assigns a place for everything Sustaining: Follows up to assure order remains Select Next to continue.   Note: If audio does not automatically start, select the play arrow in the top left to begin.5-S references a list of 5 Japanese words all starting with the letter S. They have been translated to English words which also begin with S: Sorting, Straightening, Sweeping or Shining, Standardizing and Sustaining. 5-S can be applied throughout an entire work process and can also be applied to individual portions of that process. The 5-S method removes redundant or unnecessary items during sorting, places the needed items in a logical order during straightening, cleans the area of clutter during shining, assigns places for everything during standardizing, and then follows up to assure order remains during sustaining. Select next to continue.2 5-S Purpose Organizing in the laboratory can lead to: Minimized or eliminated downtime when searching items Avoidance of safety issues Identification of bottle necks   Select Next to continue. Why do we want to have a place organized? To be able to eliminate downtime when we need to look for things, avoid safety issues, identify bottle necks, etc. In English language 5S is usually described as: sort - set in order - shine - standardise - sustain. The aim is for staff to work at a well organized area with all necessary consumables at hand so that they can work calmly, concentrate and get it right first time. Select next to continue.3 5-S Utilization   Deliver on Quality, Cost and Delivery Goals. Make problems visible and abnormality jump out.  Provides opportunities to improve processes Eliminate deep seated waste When complete, select the X in the upper-right corner to close this window and continue. Having a well organized, efficient workplace is fundamental to helping deliver on Quality, Cost and Delivery Goals. Only the fittest Organizations survive in competitive times. By applying 5S successfully you can make problems visible and abnormalities jump out. This in turn gives opportunities to improve processes and eliminate more deep seated waste. Making things “visible” helps to eliminate errors, defects and injuries. 5S helps “wash out the dirt” from an organization and give staff a sense of pride in their workplace. Creating an environment where 5s is accepted as “The way we do things around here”, is the way to creating a vibrant Lean Culture. The key to doing 5S well is to start narrow and deep. Perfect a small piece of workplace organization before going onto the next bit. Once the improvements are sustained then move on, but not before. People need to physically own the changes and the process to be successful. Key issue identification is method that is used to identify root causes of a problem. Capturing ideas and organizing thoughts around common themes Identify the major issues of concern Key issues can be identified using affinity or fishbone diagrams Key Issue Identification Learn more about Key Issue Identification. Slide NumberText BlocksCalloutsAudio ScriptImage File1 Key Issue Identification Definition   A method of determining the root cause of a problem Accomplished using cause-effect or Ishikawa diagrams  Characterize the nature of performance gaps Identify improvement opportunities   Select Next to continue. Note: If audio does not automatically start, select the play arrow in the top left to begin.Key issue identification is a method of determining the root cause of a problem by systematic modeling of the contributory factors, also known as cause-effect or Ishikawa diagrams. These tools are useful to characterize the nature of performance gaps and to identify improvement opportunities. Select Next to continue.2 Key Issue Identification Purpose   Consensus around the important group issues  Get people to think about the current issues and challenges Select Next to continue.   Key Issue Identification is a technique for getting consensus around the important issues that a group is facing using a lightning fast process. It is a great way to get people thinking about the current issues and challenges facing them in a very short space of time. Select next to continue.3 Key Issue Identification Utilization   Involve people that have experience in and a vested interest in resolving issues Technique can be used to drill down to the vital areas that affect performance Create a common list of key issues at the beginning  Use at Operational Team level   When complete, select the X in the upper-right corner to close this window and continue.It is a technique that is used to involve anyone who has experience of, and a vested interest in, resolving the issue that you are currently looking at. This technique can be used at any time to drill down to the vital areas that are affecting performance. It is a great way to get a common list of key issues at the beginning of a kaizen event or similar Rapid Improvement Event (or RIE) project. It can also be used at an Operational Team level to let people share their current issues in a constructive way. When complete, select the X in the upper-right corner to close this window and continue.